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As of October:
  • Enter the library via the South Entrance.
  • The East library doors are exit only. You can access the Market, but you will not be able to reenter the library from the East doors.
  • Masks and Social Distancing are required while in the library.
  • 4th floor is closed.
For more information visit our COVID-19 Response page.

 

Evaluating Sources

This guide will help you to understand and evaluate the different sources available for conducting research.

Librarian

Christine Edwards's picture
Christine Edwards
Contact:
Max Chambers Library
Office 115C
(405) 974-5199
Website

Evaluating Sources

You will need to use critical thinking skills to evaluate your sources. This is especially true with online-only sources or non-academic journals.  Check the following:

Authorship:

  • Is the person, group or organization responsible for the site identified?
  • What type of site have you located?  For example, is it a personal page (.net) or blog, a company website (.com), an organization (.org), a government body (.gov), or an educational institution (.edu)?

Accuracy:

  • Does the author cite reliable sources for his or her facts?
  • How does the information compare with that in other works written about this topic?

Authority:

  • What are the author's qualifications for writing on this subject?
  • Is he or she connected with an organization that has an established reputation?

Currency:

  • Does the web site include a publication date or "last updated" date?
  • Is the information provided recent? Or is it from the time period you are researching?

Objectivity:

  • Is the author affiliated with a particular organization that might have a bias?